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Welcome to the Sawdust Trail: Campmeetings and the Moral Argument

513ecYWnkfL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Dr. Baggett felt inspired to write this book about a Michigan campmeeting when his mom was sick and in the hospital in Lansing, Michigan about nine months before she died. As he walked the grounds at the Eaton Rapids Campground in Eaton Rapids, Michigan, thinking about her physical decline, he felt nostalgic thinking about his parents’ love of the place and its formative role in his upbringing. The idea occurred to write a history of the 130 year old holiness campmeeting, and now, four years later, the book by him  and his wife, with Joelee Bateman, is done and available for purchase. It’s called At the Bend of the River Grand, and available at, for example, Amazon.com. The price currently listed on Amazon.com is 45 dollars, but that’s going to change to 31.50 very soon. For those acquainted with campmeetings, you’ll appreciate reading the book and may well recognize much of what’s discussed; for those less familiar, we hope the book brings a little bit of campmeeting to you. Before too long we at MoralApologetics.com may feature a Campmeeting writing contest, the winner of which will receive a free copy of the book.

If you’re wondering how campmeeting connects with moral apologetics, that will become clear in the course of the interview, but quickly: campmeeting is about both evangelism and living a victorious Christian life. So it touches in a very practical way on what we here at the site call the performative variant of moral apologetics: how by God’s enablement we are made able to live victoriously, finding victory over sin, and, ultimately, being conformed entirely to the image of Christ.

Podcast: Emily Heady on the Christian Worldview, Ethics, and A Christmas Carol

Podcast with Emily Heady

In this special Christmas edition of the podcast, we sit down with Dr. Emily Heady to discuss Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Dr. Heady holds a Ph.D. in English Literature with a concentration in Victorian Studies. She also has a special interest in the work of Charles Dickens and has published articles and books exploring his novels. In this episode, Dr. Heady explains how A Christmas Carol relates to ethics and the Christian worldview.

Photo:  “A Christmas Carol, New York Public Library” By G. Ziegler. CC Licence.

Music:  “O Come O Come Emmanuel” by IKOS David Clifton with the choirs of Peterborough Cathedral. CC License. 

Podcast: Thoughts on the Paris Attacks and Other News

In this week’s podcast, editors of Moralapologetics.com, Dr. David Baggett and Jonathan Pruitt, share some thoughts on the Paris terrorist attacks, the Starbucks controversy, and the recent college protests.

Thoughts on the Paris Attacks and Other News

 

Image:”Paris Night” by Benh LIEU SONG – Own work. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Paris_Night.jpg#/media/File:Paris_Night.jpg

Podcast: C. S. Lewis and the Problem of Personal Suffering with David Baggett

In this week’s podcast, we hear from Dr. David Baggett as he discusses two of C. S. Lewis’ most psychologically insightful works, A Grief Observed and The Great Divorce. Dr. Baggett helps us understand how Lewis thought we should deal with intense emotional pain, how the love of God “has teeth,” and how moral transformation may require much suffering.

Image: “Premade BG 32” by Brenda Clarke. CC License. 

Podcast: Understanding C.S. Lewis’ Moral Argument with Dr. David Baggett

On this week’s episode, we hear from the co-author of Good God, Dr. David Baggett. Dr. Baggett explains how Lewis’ moral argument works, what makes it effective, and the impact it has had on contemporary moral apologetics.

 

Image: “The Lion, the Witch . . . – geograph.org.uk – 317441” by Albert Bridge. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Lion,_the_Witch_._._._-_geograph.org.uk_-_317441.jpg#/media/File:The_Lion,_the_Witch_._._._-_geograph.org.uk_-_317441.jpg

Podcast: A Christian Perspective on Bioethics with Mark Foreman

On this week’s podcast, Dr. Mark Foreman gives a Christian perspective on some key bio-ethical issues. Dr. Foreman helps us understand how we should think about trans-humanism, fertility treatments, abortion, assisted suicide, and euthanasia. Working from a Christian and Aristotelian and natural law perspective, Dr. Foreman explains how right action results from careful consideration of human nature.

Image: “Icarus.” by Rogério Timóteo – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Icarus..jpg#/media/File:Icarus..jpg

Podcast: Mark Foreman Explains Why Abortion is Wrong in Ten Minutes

On this week’s podcast, we hear from philosopher and bioethicist Mark Foreman. Dr. Foreman explains in about ten minutes why humans still in the womb are persons and deserve all the rights due to human persons.

An Argument against Abortion in Ten Minutes with Mark Foreman

Image: “Embryo week 9-10″ by lunar caustic. CC License. 

Podcast: Mark Foreman on Faith, Reason, and Natural Law

On this week’s podcast, we hear from Dr. Mark Foreman. Dr. Foreman is a professional philosopher who specializes in both Christian apologetics and bioethics. The main topic of this episode is theism as a natural law ethic. Dr. Foreman will explain what a natural law ethic is, why we should prefer it, how it can be applied in moral dilemmas, and  how to use it in apologetics. But before we get to that, we’ll also get to hear some thoughts from Dr. Foreman on the relation of faith and reason.

 

Podcast: David Baggett on the Problem of Evil

On this week’s episode, we hear from David Baggett. Dr. Baggett is a professor of apologetics at the Liberty University School of Divinity and the co-author of Good God, Christianity Today‘s 2012 Book of the Year in Apologetics. Dr. Baggett gives us a preview of the chapter on the problem of evil in the upcoming sequel to Good God, God and Cosmos. He explains why the problem of evil really is a problem, for both atheists and Christians, and why Christianity has a better response to the problem.

Image: “Jewish Cemetery” by Mycroyance. CC License.