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John Hare’s God’s Command, 6.3.2, “Al-Ash’ari”
summary by David Baggett Al-Ash’ari doesn’t reject the use of reason, but he does wish to reject the Mu’tazilite approach, but not to stop doing theology. Rather, he wished to use it for the defense of a more traditional doctrine. He uses reason conspicuously. But the relation between reason and revelation is approximately the opposite way round from how al-...

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John Hare’s God’s Command, 6.3, “Revelation and Reason”
summary by David Baggett All three of our authors have an important place for both revelation and reason, but they describe the relation between the two sources of knowledge differently. The term ‘revelation’ is a convenience, but is potentially misleading. It would be better, but cumbersome, to talk about God’s deliverances through the Scriptures and the Tr...

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Lord’s Supper Meditation – Food for the Body
A Twilight Musing By Elton Higgs  (See Num. 11:4-10; John 6:30-34, 48-51) “We have lost our appetite; we never see anything but this manna!” (Num. 11:5b). When we read in Numbers 11 the account of the Israelites complaining about the miraculous daily manna from heaven, we are amazed at their perversity in rejecting God’s miraculous daily supply of food for t...

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John Hare’s God’s Command, 6.2.3, “Al-Maturidi,”
summary by David Baggett Al-Maturidi’s complex views on human freedom and divine command are best understood through three distinctions that he makes, distinctions between two kinds of power, two kinds of divine attitude, and two kinds of divine decree. Let’s start with the two kinds of power. Of these, the second kind of power is relatively straightforward....

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God’s Extravagance
  A Twilight Musing By Elton Higgs             We have a politician on the national scene who consistently speaks in superlatives, a practice which leads to some skepticism about when the superlative is really applicable to the thing he’s talking about—sort of the “boy who cried ‘Wolf!’ principle.  We all have some temptation to exaggerate in order to e...

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The Risk of Loving
  A Twilight Musing  By Elton Higgs  It is best to learn early that we are not loved by other human beings solely because of what we are.  At best, we may be loved for what people perceive us to be or want us to be, but most often we are loved because of the lover’s needs, not our own.  Only God loves because of who He is, and only God can be loved beca...

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Bénigne Gagneraux: Den blinde Oidipus anbefaller sin familj åt gudarna.
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Sophocles and the Doctrine of Sin: A Reflection on Teaching Greek Tragedy
  Josh Herring This past year I taught 9th grade Ancient Literature for the second time. My first year teaching this curriculum I spent too much time in Homer, and did not make it to tragedy; this year, my goal was to pace the course correctly and work through the most significant plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Along the journey, I discov...

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Max McLean in Fellowship for Performing Arts' C.S. LEWIS ONSTAGE THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT, photo by Jeremy Daniel 7
The Most Reluctant Convert: C. S. Lewis Onstage, Part III
By David Baggett  Part I  Part II We had been told to wait in the lobby of the second floor for Max McLean to arrive, which he did about fifteen minutes later. After one performance and before another, with a Q&A sandwiched in between, I marveled in advance at his generosity of time. We didn’t want to waste his energies, so we dove right in after quick i...

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The Ministry of Reconciliation
A Twilight Musing By Elton Higgs   When I consider the difficulty of mending broken human relationships, I’m reminded of the nursery rhyme about how “all the king’s horses and all the king’s men/ Couldn’t put Humpty together again.”  Any professional counselor is able to relate cases of marital or other interpersonal conflicts where the alienation of the par...

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Max McLean in Fellowship for Performing Arts' C.S. LEWIS ONSTAGE THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT, photo by
The Most Reluctant Convert: C. S. Lewis Onstage, Part II
By David Baggett Part I  Like others who have been privileged to see what next transpired, I was thrilled and transported. It was as if C. S. Lewis himself walked onto the stage. The makeup was exquisite, and the resemblance to Lewis uncanny. Even the voice was near perfect—I remember having listened to one of the few extant recordings of Lewis a year ago. M...

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What Women Want
By Tom Thomas  King Arthur’s Queen Guinevere baffles him.  Like Arthur every other man is perplexed too.  We don’t know what makes her tick or what she wants.  In the Broadway play ‘Camelot’ King Arthur muses to himself.  He cannot figure Guinevere out.   I so identify with him.  King Arthur remembers Merlin the Magician teaching him about the animals.  Merl...

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Max McLean in Fellowship for Performing Arts' C.S. LEWIS ONSTAGE THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT, photo by Jeremy Daniel 5
The Most Reluctant Convert: C. S. Lewis Onstage, Part I
  by David Baggett It was Halloween Eve, Mischief Night as it’s often dubbed, the penultimate day of October in 1938. At a time when the radio was the main source of news and entertainment, the big draw that evening was the legendary Edgar Bergen and his ventriloquist dummy Charlie McCarthy. Popular lore says that a musical interlude in Bergen’s perform...

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Quote of the Month

“Plato was so much more than the author of a philosophical theory; he was one of the world’s supreme dramatists, with the great dramatist’s insight into a vast range of human character and experience, an insight only possible to a nature itself quickly and richly responsive to a world of suggestion which narrower natures of the specialist type miss. If I am found in the sequel appealing to the testimony of ‘moralists,’ I trust it will be understood that by moralists I do not mean primarily men who have devoted themselves to the elaboration of ethical systems, the Aristotles, or even the Kants, but men who have lived richly and deeply and thought as well as lived, the Platos, Augustines, Dostoevskys, and their fellows.”

A. E. Taylor