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John Hare’s God’s Command, 7.1 “Maimonides”
Summary by Jonathan Pruitt In Chapter 7, Hare explores the tensions between divine command theory and Jewish thinkers. Hare suggests that though there are important differences between the Abrahamic faiths, they nevertheless all “wrestle with the question of how divine command relates to human nature.” In the first of three sections, Hare concerns himself w...

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New Edition of C. S. Lewis as Philosopher: Truth, Goodness, and Beauty
From the Preface to the 2017 Edition of C. S. Lewis as Philosopher: Truth, Goodness, and Beauty It has been nearly ten years now since the first edition of C. S. Lewis as Philosopher: Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. That decade has seen only growing interest in the philosophical aspects of Lewis’s work. What at the time seemed to us to be a rather novel approac...

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For a Friend Battling Darkness
A Twilight Musing By Elton Higgs I just finished an astoundingly blessed conversation with a dear friend and brother in Christ who is in the midst of a struggle with severe depression.  I am aware of the danger of being presumptuous in trying to help someone negotiate depths of horrible feelings that I have not gone through myself, and I can justify it onl...

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Waiting on God
A Twilight Musing  By Elton Higgs    Those of my generation may remember a bygone country song that reflects the old southern custom of making kids wait to eat until the adults were served.  In the meantime, they were told to “take an old cold ‘tater and wait.”  That bit of social history reminds me that in general we Americans regard waiting as an impositio...

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An Old Example
“An Old Example” is a sermon by Dennis Kinlaw and here he examines Genesis 12:1-9, God’s calling of Abraham, and urges listeners to submit their lives and possessions to God’s will. Dr. Kinlaw was president and chancellor of Asbury College; he also taught Old Testament. He is also the author of many books, including This Day with the ...

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John Hare, summary of “Divine Command Theory” of Christian Ethics: Four Views
by Jeff Dickson Moral Right and Wrong In his chapter on divine command theory (DCT), John Hare argues that “what makes something morally wrong…is that God forbids it, and what make something morally right…is that God requires it.” To this end, Hare first defines moral obligation (moral right and moral wrong). Although Hare reveals that other explanations for...

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New Associate Editor: T. J. Gentry
  MoralApologetics.com is excited to announce a New Associate Editor: T. J. Gentry. He’ll be joining our team with the particular intent of focusing on pastoral issues related to moral apologetics. He shares a passion for the moral argument(s) and brings much to his new post. He is, in his own words, a “mere Christian with genuine fascination and awe for the...

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Moral Arguments for Theistic Belief
By Robert Adams Robert Adams is the author of multiple books, including Finite and Infinite Goods.  More than one person has credited Adams with resurrecting Divine Command Theory among philosophers of religion.  ADAMS1phil1reading  

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Chapter 6, God and Cosmos, “Moral Knowledge” (Epistemic)
  by Frederick Choo To start off this chapter, Baggett and Walls give a set of scenarios. Suppose you look at a clock tower at 2 o’clock and form the belief that it is 2 o’clock. The first scenario is the discursive knowledge case. The clock is accurate and fully functional in this case. Given this, one seems to have justification and (infer...

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Till We Have Faces, Self-Knowledge, and Learning to Die
By David & Marybeth Baggett One important way that C. S. Lewis went about irrigating deserts and planting gardens was to be honest that the tide had turned against many of his most cherished convictions, and since he was convinced that the new direction was mistaken, he would often point backwards. To the charge that this was retrograde, he famously said...

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Steve Wilkens’ Christian Ethics: Four Views, “Natural Law” by Peterson
Summary by Jeff Dickson  Natural Law representative Claire Brown Peterson understands her ethical system as the theory that “morality is rooted in … who we are as human beings.” Peterson believes that like the other theories represented in this volume, what is being delineated in her programs is “true morality—how human beings really ought to live and relate...

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Quote of the Month

“Plato was so much more than the author of a philosophical theory; he was one of the world’s supreme dramatists, with the great dramatist’s insight into a vast range of human character and experience, an insight only possible to a nature itself quickly and richly responsive to a world of suggestion which narrower natures of the specialist type miss. If I am found in the sequel appealing to the testimony of ‘moralists,’ I trust it will be understood that by moralists I do not mean primarily men who have devoted themselves to the elaboration of ethical systems, the Aristotles, or even the Kants, but men who have lived richly and deeply and thought as well as lived, the Platos, Augustines, Dostoevskys, and their fellows.”

A. E. Taylor